Digital marketers monitor things like what is being viewed, how often and for how long, sales conversions, what content works and doesn’t work, etc. While the Internet is, perhaps, the channel most closely associated with digital marketing, others include text messaging, instant messaging, apps, podcasts, electronic billboards, digtal television and radio channels, etc.
While working at a Fortune 100 company for nine years before moving to lead my current team, I became fascinated by customer behavior. What kinds of digital offerings most deeply engage customers in their digital lives? I started by looking at some case studies of the products, services, communications and experiences that had been embraced and adopted by customers during the first two decades of the internet. Over a period of seven years working on inbound marketing campaigns, what I found was a recurring pattern of three behaviors that drove the adoption of new digital experiences, which I call the three core behaviors of a network:
Okay, obviously, this is not something that I can link you to, but Danny runs great webinars. You know those webinars that are basically just very long sales pitches and nothing more? Well, that’s not the case with Danny, because in his webinars he shares very useful insights on online marketing. I really try not to miss those. You have to be subscribed to Danny’s e-mail list to know when something is coming up, though.
With the rise of platforms such as Yelp or TripAdvisor, digital word-of-mouth has become a major concern for marketers. Online reviews, including brand mentions posted on social networks, are more influential now than ever, with the majority of consumers trusting them to ensure they make informed buying decisions. Consequentially, reviews are the cornerstone of online reputation management — a legitimate facet of digital marketing — and all fear the negative review.
One of the issues the digital marketing industry is facing is that there are sometimes no barriers to entry, meaning that anyone with a loose grasp of industry terminology can potentially get a position in a company. But as this industry matures, recruiters are becoming savvier about what differentiates a candidate that can talk the talk but could be a costly mistake for the company.
Trying multiple marketing methods and only putting limited input into each will only bring frustration. Instead, focus all your energy on one or two marketing approaches. Master them and make sure you have exhausted their capabilities before moving on or adding a new approach to your armory. Don’t keep dipping your fingers in and out of a bucketful of ideas hoping that one will suddenly come to fruition.

Connecting the dots between marketing and sales is hugely important -- according to Aberdeen Group, companies with strong sales and marketing alignment achieve a 20% annual growth rate, compared to a 4% decline in revenue for companies with poor alignment. If you can improve your customer's' journey through the buying cycle by using digital technologies, then it's likely to reflect positively on your business's bottom line.
Make sure that you understand all of the potential marketing opportunities on LinkedIn. All of your customer’s key employees should have complete profiles on LinkedIn. Those managers should also post articles and blog links to the site frequently. People use LinkedIn to network, find business and also look for jobs. Use your marketing knowledge to ensure that your clients have a presence on LinkedIn.
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