Because of the recent debate about the use of the term ‘digital marketing’, we thought it would be useful to pin down exactly what digital means through a definition. Do definitions matter? We think they do, since particularly within an organization or between a business and its clients we need clarity to support the goals and activities that support Digital Transformation. As we'll see, many of the other definitions are misleading.

Mixergy is a website that publishes interviews and courses with successful entrepreneurs. It’s an amazing resource for anyone who wants to learn more about business and entrepreneurship. Mixergy is the only paid membership website on this list: monthly membership costs 25$/month and it’s a steal considering the quality of information they provide. I’m NOT an affiliate of Mixergy, by the way.
Codeacademy offers free, interactive coding classes that take you from lesson one to building a fully-functioning website. The courses we've highlighted below are just a few of the courses; Codeacademy offers many more, depending on your organization's needs. Codeacademy classes feature lectures and a workspace in the same browser window so you can see the effect of your work live, as it's created.
Companies often use email marketing to re-engage past customers, but a “Where’d You Go? Want To Buy This?” message can come across as aggressive, and you want to be careful with your wording to cultivate a long-term email subscriber. This is why JetBlue’s one year re-engagement email works so well -- it uses humor to convey a sense of friendliness and fun, while simultaneously reminding an old email subscriber they might want to check out some of JetBlue’s new flight deals.
I’ve learned a lot about online marketing on my own own/forums/blogs/working on my own projects, but l’ve learned A LOT more by working at companies with established online marketing programs, that provide paid training, and working on teams. I think the average person getting started, unless they are the lemonade-stand type of kid their entire life, will learn a lot better taking a entry-level gig at a good digital marketing agency, rather than work on their own business from scratch. It’s high pressure, but you’ll learn the ropes a lot quicker and have the benefit from a steady paycheck if you have bills (not everyone can live in their mom’s basement). Then once you have a year or two under your belt, if you desire you can jump ship and apply that knowledge to your own business.
Thanks for a great post, love your point about continuing with what drives traffic and dumping what doesn’t. From your experience, how do you determine if a strategy really isn’t working, or if it just hasn’t been put in place persistent enough to see the results? I anticipate some strategies are more long term and won’t show effects immediately, so without the benefit of hindsight, how do we decide whether to keep going or not when we are trying something new?

The digital marketer usually focuses on a different key performance indicator (KPI) for each channel so they can properly measure the company's performance across each one. A digital marketer who's in charge of SEO, for example, measures their website's "organic traffic" -- of that traffic coming from website visitors who found a page of the business's website via a Google search.
Industry knowledge and analytical thinking are both key to online marketing success. However, if you aren’t willing or able to actually execute your plans, you’ll never succeed online. Do you frequently start projects or tasks but then fail to complete them? Do you prefer the planning stage of tasks to the actual execution of those tasks? Do you get excited by research, but lose steam when it comes to implementation? If so, online marketing may not be the career path for you.
Shifting the focus to the time span, we may need to measure some "Interim Metrics", which give us some insight during the journey itself, as well as we need to measure some "Final Metrics" at the end of the journey to inform use if the overall initiative was successful or not. As an example, most of social media metrics and indicators such as likes, shares and engagement comments may be classified as interim metrics while the final increase/decrease in sales volume is clearly from the final category.
There are ten essential types of marketing that can be done online. Some of these can be broken down into organic marketing and others can be categorized as paid marketing. Organic, of course, is the allure of marketing professionals from around the planet. It's free and its unencumbered traffic that simply keeps coming. Paid marketing, on the other hand, is still a very attractive proposition as long as the marketing pays for itself by having the right type of offer that converts.

A lot of concepts were foreign to me, and I came across this post on link blending, and I was like, “What the heck is link blending? What is this guy talking about? I never heard of this before.” So that concept, in itself, got me e-mailing Neil, and I just kept e-mailing him over and over. If you want a mentor, if you want somebody to learn from, and you’re persistent, they’re going to notice you over time. I kept pestering Neil, and finally he was just like, “You know, dude, let’s just get on the phone.”
Going into network marketing? Understand that if you're not close to the top of the food chain there, your ability to generate any serious amount of income will be limited. Be wary of the hype and the sales pitches that get you thinking that it's going to work the other way. Simply understand that you're going to have to work hard no matter what you pick to do. Email marketing? Sure. You can do that. But you'll need a massive and very targeted list to make any dent.
Josh Steimle had quite an early start when he put up his digital marketing agency called MWI back in 1999 while juggling this then-startup and college. All his efforts paid off, and he’s now the CEO of this company that’s still killing it. He also shares his knowledge by contributing to major publications such as Mashable, Forbes, TechCrunch, and Entrepreneur.com. Plus, he’s a TEDx presenter and the author of “Chief Marketing Officers at Work.”
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