Over the past 8 years, more than 100,000 people from over 100 countries have participated in Google's Online Marketing Challenge. It's an online course with modules covering introductory digital marketing, search engine marketing, search advertising, display advertising, mobile, social, analytics, and video, making it one of the more comprehensive courses for beginners. However, it's also unique in that Google gives learners a $250 AdWords budget to use over a three-week period, to run an online advertising campaign for a business or not-for-profit. The most successful learners can even win prizes from Google.
It is very rare for an individual to enter a management role early in his or her career. Most marketing managers have spent several years working somewhere else on a marketing team. This assumes the existence of at least a bachelor's degree, but an advanced degree such as a master’s in marketing or business administration can give an aspiring manager a deciding edge.
Before online marketing channels emerged, the cost to market products or services was often prohibitively expensive, and traditionally difficult to measure. Think of national television ad campaigns, which are measured through consumer focus groups to determine levels of brand awareness. These methods are also not well-suited to controlled experimentation. Today, anyone with an online business (as well as most offline businesses) can participate in online marketing by creating a website and building customer acquisition campaigns at little to no cost. Those marketing products and services also have the ability to experiment with optimization to fine-tune their campaigns’ efficiency and ROI.
Marketing requires creativity. That creativity can come in many forms. Graphic designers put together visual presentations to attract customers. Writers create content that is designed to engage the reader and keep them interested. A programmer writes code to create a web page that is easy to navigate. Regardless of your marketing role, you need to think creatively.
×